Friday, September 11, 2020

Big Trees

I have some interest in the Big Tree program for NH, run out of UNH, as I discovered one of the state champions, put them on to a second, and identified a few county champions as well.  I just nominated another one, an American (White) Basswood on Clinton St in Concord, across the driveway from the courthouse. 

Therefore, the idea that they are changing how girths are measured is interesting.  Because of multiple trunks on many trees and the difficulty sorting out whether it is more than one, the old-fashioned method of just running a tape measure around the trunk is no longer favored.  The change is a good thing.  I like precision and clarity.

5 comments:

james said...

Wikipedia on the Baobob: "Tree diameter fluctuates with rainfall "

I wonder if there's some girth measurement technique that would decrease mine...

GraniteDad said...

Technically if you removed all the water out of yourself, your waist’s girth would shrink as well. What’s the worst that could happen?

Korora said...

Baobabs have no place on tiny planetoids, though.

PenGun said...

I have cut trees on the ground that were over 8' wide, for firewood. I do live on Vancouver Island though.

Now we harvest what we used to call pencils, stuff under a foot in diameter. As I wander my mountains I have come to know many of the people who work in the woods. What used to take a 50 man crew, is now done by 7 guys and some serious machines.

Big Grabber

Texan99 said...

The Texas champion live oaks are quite small by Yankee standards, though we're attached to them.

I once watched a huge Northern California redwood be cut down. It made a boom when it hit the ground like nothing I'd ever heard, but it was nothing special in its neighborhood, where the really old-growth stuff had long since disappeared.