Monday, May 08, 2006

Real World

Benjamin graduates from Asbury College this Sunday. It is traditional at graduation for someone to make snide comments about entering the “real world.” Of course, whatever you do in life, someone will tell you it’s not the Real World. My in-laws complained years ago about a new priest who didn’t have much real world experience. He had previously been running a Korean orphanage. Sounds pretty real to me. I work at a psychiatric hospital, and am paid by the taxpayers via the State of NH. Is that the real world? Dunno.

Those guys in the military, who supposedly need to be told what to do and have trouble adjusting to the real world, or teachers and professors who spend their days with the young, or at-home moms who don’t get out much – I guess that’s not the real world either. If you work off-shifts and sleep when other people are up, or spend most of your day at a computer screen, how real is that? If you trade commodities but never see any actual oil or wheat, then you are clearly not connected to the “real” world. Ministers, retirees, entertainers and athletes, wealthy people, those on wlefare – pretty much everyone, I guess.

The guys at Home Depot – I think they may be real

5 comments:

Mark said...
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Mark said...
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Mark said...

My uncle worked at the Concord psychiatric hospital and went on to finsih his state career at social services. He didn't believe in them, but took his check managing them. Very odd but the I don't get conservatives anyway. They live in Canterbury.

a guy in pajamas said...

There is no real world; we all just make it up as we go along.

:-)

Wacky Hermit said...

I suffered for a long time from the delusion that whatever I did, I still didn't have a "real" life because my life wasn't just like somebody else's. Then I realized that if it were just like somebody else's, it wouldn't be "authentic." After a while it occurred to me that I was looking at it backwards; that everything in my life was by definition occurring in a "real," "authentic" life.